Food industry partner for IQF fruits and fruit puree

Established in 1958 / 20+ different markets / 8 nationalities working in Polproduct

Rhubarb

Origin(s)Belgium, Netherlands, Poland, Various
VarietyGreen, Pink, Various
CultivationCultivated
Possible certificationHalal, Kosher, Organic
Organic avilabilityYes
IQF AvailabilitySlice
IQF Packaging10kg carton, 25kg bag, 4x2,5kg carton, 5x1 kg carton
Puree availabilityAseptic, Frozen
Packaging aseptic10kg Bag-in-Box, 200kg Drum, 20kg Bag-in-Box, 2x5 kg Bag-in-Box
Packaging frozen10kg Plastic pail, 180kg Drum, 18kg Wax carton
Sieve size for puree0,3 mm - 0,8 mm, 1,0 mm - 5,0 mm
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General description

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is the fleshy, edible stalks (petioles) of species and hybrids (culinary rhubarb) of Rheum in the family Polygonaceae, which are cooked and used for food.[2] The whole plant – a herbaceous perennial growing from short, thick rhizomes – is also called rhubarb. Historically, different plants have been called “rhubarb” in English. The large, triangular leaves contain high levels of oxalic acid and anthrone glycosides, making them inedible. The small flowers are grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

The precise origin of culinary rhubarb is unknown. The species Rheum rhabarbarum (syn. R. undulatum) and R. rhaponticum were grown in Europe before the 18th century and used for medicinal purposes. By the early 18th century, these two species and a possible hybrid of unknown origin, R. × hybridum, were grown as vegetable crops in England and Scandinavia. They readily hybridize, and culinary rhubarb was developed by selecting open-pollinated seed, so that its precise origin is almost impossible to determine. In appearance, samples of culinary rhubarb vary on a continuum between R. rhaponticum and R. rhabarbarum. However, modern rhubarb cultivars are tetraploids with 2n = 44, in contrast to 2n = 22 for the wild species.

Although rhubarb is a vegetable, it is often put to the same culinary uses as fruits.[5] The leaf stalks can be used raw, when they have a crisp texture (similar to celery, although it is in a different family), but are most commonly cooked with sugar and used in pies, crumbles and other desserts. They have a strong, tart taste. Many cultivars have been developed for human consumption, most of which are recognised as Rheum × hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Source: Wikipedia


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